All posts filed under: The Liquor Box

The Liquor Box, Part 5 Finished

Hey y’all. We left off last time with the box components completed, but not glued together. There remains three steps which need to be accomplished before I can call the box finished. First, the box lid and the box itself are basically a frame and panel assembly. The sides of the box and lid form the frame and the top and bottom are the panel. The top and bottom are sized to allow for seasonal wood movement and will float within their frames. Due to this, I need to apply the finish to the top and bottom prior to glue-up. Applying finish means I need to get the top and bottom ready for finish. The material for both is walnut which was sourced from a friend. The board given to me had some of the pith or center of the tree in it. Some of the pith was soft resembling rot, but I’m not sure it was actually decay associated with wood rot. Regardless, I needed to remove a small amount of loose material and …

The Liquor Box, Part 4

A reminder that I built this project last year while I wasn’t blogging. If you recall in my last Liquor Box post (see it here), I had the basic shell of the box fabricated. Due to my chosen joinery method for the interior dividers, I’ll need to make the dividers and fit them to the sides before I can glue everything together. These dividers are another indicator that box making is different from furniture making due to the fact that box parts are smaller, more delicate things vs. the big honkin’ leg that can be found on a dining room table. Or even the top of a common side table. I chose mortise and tenon joinery for the dividers. The dividers are 1/4″ thick walnut and the tenon on one end is 1/4″ long and the opposite end is only 1/8″ long. Small tenons and equally small, shallow mortises. Cutting the mortises for this step is another reason for buying my Lie-Nielson small, closed throat router plane. I used it to fine tune the joinery …

The Liquor Box, Part 3

It’s time in this project to use a live sawn board of walnut a friend gave me. Live sawn lumber is where a log is sent through a saw mill and slabs of wood are created much like seen in this video. So this board had all the bark on it and all the saw marks created by the mill were present. There was a time when using this type of material would not have been possible for me. Actually, the time spans a majority of my woodworking past. Early on I saw the need to buy a jointer which I used primarily to obtain a straight edge on boards. The addition of a planer to create a smooth face came many years later. And I added a 8″ jointer to my workshop only recently. My original 6″ jointer was small enough that I did not use it to flatten faces of lumber. Now I can process lumber like this and I can even drive a short distance to the Alabama Woodworkers Guild and use …